SCR 1029/HCR 2021 call on the United States Congress to enact the Born-Alive Abortion Survivors Protection Act and the Ensuring Accurate and Complete Abortion Data Reporting Act of 2019. A “born-alive” infant is an infant who is born alive at any age or stage of development, following natural labor, a caesarian section, or an induced abortion. A civilized society should never deny basic medical care to any child born alive – including one who survives an attempted abortion.
Bill Status:
02/20/20 Passed Senate Third Read (16-9-5)
Bill History

02/17/20 Passed Senate Rules

02/13/20 Passed Senate Judiciary (4-2-1)

02/04/20 Senate Second Read

02/03/20 Referred to Senate Judiciary

02/03/20 Referred to Senate Rules

02/03/20 Senate First Read

Introduced Version Here.

Fact Sheet

Executive Summary

SCR 1029/HCR 2021 call on the United States Congress to enact the Born-Alive Abortion Survivors Protection Act and the Ensuring Accurate and Complete Abortion Data Reporting Act of 2019. A “born-alive” infant is an infant who is born alive at any age or stage of development, following natural labor, a caesarian section, or an induced abortion. A civilized society should never deny basic medical care to any child born alive – including one who survives an attempted abortion.

Background

The U.S. Congress enacted the federal Born-Alive Infants Protection Act in 2002 to “repudiate the flawed notion that the right to an abortion means the right to a dead baby.” The law has proven to be inadequate in providing legal protections for infants surviving attempted abortions. For example, the 2013 trial of notorious Philadelphia abortionist Kermit Gosnell provided evidence of born-alive infants being denied medical care. Gosnell was convicted for deliberately killing three such infants after he performed late-term abortion procedures.

The Born-Alive Abortion Survivors Protection Act pending before the current Congress supplements the 2002 law to ensure that health care providers “exercise the same degree of professional skill, care and diligence to preserve the life and health of a child” born alive as the provider would “render to any other child born alive.”

In 2017, the Arizona Legislature enacted SB 1367 to strengthen Arizona’s laws on babies born alive to ensure those babies are provided life-saving care. The law also added reporting requirements. The impetus for strengthening the Arizona law resulted from a tragic situation in which a baby that survived an abortion was not given life-saving care. In 2017 alone, Arizona reported that 10 infants were born alive following the abortion procedure.

Both the federal and state laws are necessary to serve as reinforcement mechanisms for each other and to have the most comprehensive laws possible to protect these babies.

Talking Points

  1. Every innocent human life is valuable, precious, and worthy of full protection.
  2. A civilized society never denies basic medical care to any child born alive – including one who survives an attempted abortion.
  3. Refusing basic medical care to a born-alive infant is not health care.
  4. Every baby born alive deserves a chance at life. A baby who survives an attempted abortion should not be left to die or denied nourishment.
  5. Women deserve to know the whole truth, including that some infants survive abortion. The best choice is an informed choice. A woman who knows the many dangerous risks of abortion, the reality of what the abortion will do to her child and to herself, and her options as a parent is far more likely to protect her child’s life.

Conclusion

The Arizona legislature should support these resolutions because infants born at any stage of development are persons. The Born-Alive Abortion Survivors Protection Act supplements existing federal law to require that health care providers preserve the life and health of a child born alive, as recognized in Arizona statute.  Further, it remedies the problem of underreporting by requiring the Ensuring Accurate and Complete Abortion Data Reporting Act of 2019 be enacted.

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